In China, making a visa interview appointment must provide their fee receipt number. When the visa applicant calls to make an appointment, the fee receipt is required to prove that the applicant has paid the fee in advance of making the appointment. Regardless of whether there is an appointment available at the time when the applicant wants, the fee is non-transferable and non-refundable.

 

Effective on November 15th, 2010 applicants making visa interview appointments must provide their fee receipt number. When the visa applicant calls to make an appointment, the fee receipt is required to prove that the applicant has paid the fee in advance of making the appointment. Regardless of whether there is an appointment available at the time when the applicant wants, the fee is non-transferable and non-refundable.

Furthermore, for those who seek an “expedited” appointment for a true emergency, such appointments may be granted if the emergency is justified. But what constitutes as emergency in the eyes of a consular officer is unclear. For example, the Embassy’s website mentions “humanitarian” situations involving hospitalized “immediate relatives” (i.e., parents, spouse, and children) but is silent about grandparents, siblings, etc. Nor does the Embassy mention when, if ever, an expedite can be granted for a business emergency. To request an expedited appointment, you’ll first need to pay the fee and book an appointment. Then follow the particular Consulate’s procedures to email or fax in your expedite request. This is the same procedure for the U.S. Consulate in Bangkok and Ho Chi Minh City. However, if your appointment is not expedited, and there’s no more reason to travel to the U.S, the Embassy still keeps your money.

So the question is why the procedure is necessary. People who feel like they gambled on the appointment system and lost may not feel warm and fuzzy about America.