The economy is in the doldrums. Baby boomers nearing retirement have lost their nest eggs in the volatile market. Jobless numbers are the highest in years. Given these pressing issues, immigration reform has taken a back seat to bailout plans, energy independence, the war in the Middle East, and practically everything else. With the increasing number of jobless Americans, how can we as a nation justify immigrant-friendly policies?

 

The economy is in the doldrums. Baby boomers nearing retirement have lost their nest eggs in the volatile market. Jobless numbers are the highest in years. Given these pressing issues, immigration reform has taken a back seat to bailout plans, energy independence, the war in the Middle East, and practically everything else. With the increasing number of jobless Americans, how can we as a nation justify immigrant-friendly policies?

Immigration has always been a subject of heated debate. We have accused immigrants of taking away American jobs, increasing crime, and fundamentally changing our way of life. Economists have long argued the opposite – that immigrants by taking jobs U.S. workers are unwilling or unable to do, make us a more productive and competitive nation. Immigrants come here to make a life for themselves and their families. They work hard, pay taxes, and try to fit in.

Pittsburgh has a long history of immigration. During the early 1900’s, a large number of German, Polish, and other workers were brought here to work in the coal mines. With the decline of the steel industry, workers lost their jobs but stayed here in Pittsburgh.

Currently, with the “reinvention” of Pittsburgh as a high-tech haven and medical super-center, it is attracting another type of immigrant – a highly educated, professional worker in the engineering, high-tech, or medical field. Although Hispanics constitute the largest immigrant group in the U.S., Pittsburgh is home to more Indian immigrants that any other nationality. But with job losses across the board, it is not surprising that employment-based immigration to the U.S. has started to decline, and this trend is likely to continue.

Congress is burdening taxpayers with the costs of bailing out industries in order to stave off even more job losses. But why not use immigrants to bail out the economy? We already provide E2 visas to those individuals from select countries who are willing to start or invest in a business in the U.S. Why not expand the program to individuals from more countries? A little-known visa category, the EB-5, qualifies foreign investors for a Green Card if they are willing to invest at least $500,000 in a “targeted employment area” and create at least 10 jobs. Pittsburgh is one such area. We would do well to seek out such investors, individuals who could not only create jobs and invest in our growth, but who would make Pittsburgh a more attractive place for the young and talented.

America is undoubtedly one of the most desirable places to live in the world. Here, we can still reap the benefits of hard work and enterprise, express our opinions freely, and live wherever we choose. We should consider taking steps to attract the many well-qualified, hardworking, and talented people from all over the world who would like to live, work, and invest in our country.

It is time the Obama Administration take a close look at our immigration policies and make it easier for foreign investors to come the U.S., start businesses, create jobs, and help rebuild our nation.