The blue sheet is issued if the consular officer finds that the evidence submitted did not satisfactorily demonstrate that the couple had entered into the premarital relationship to marry. Implying that the relationship was entered into to evade immigration law and gain immigration benefits, which is a violation of the Immigration and Nationality Act or INA.

 

Any American citizen who has met and fallen in love with someone abroad and wants to bring their future spouse to America has to file a K1 Fiance(e) Visa on Form I-129F. This form and supporting documents are sent to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Service or USCIS for approval. As a general procedural process, the initial I-129F Petition is routinely approved with the National Visa Center or NVC after performing a paper review and forwarding the case to the Embassy where the fiancée resides.

The NVC is charged with the responsibility of ensuring that the filing fee is paid, the required passport photos are attached, the Biographical Data Form is included, and the forms are signed. It is not the NVC’s role to determine whether the fiancée abroad is eligible for the K1 visa, which is the role of the Department of State after a thorough investigation and personal interview.

While the initial I-129F process is quite painless, most couples are bewildered when they receive a “blue sheet” or 221(g) from the Embassy abroad. The blue sheet is issued if the consular officer finds that the evidence submitted did not satisfactorily demonstrate that the couple had entered into the premarital relationship to marry. Implying that the relationship was entered into to evade immigration law and gain immigration benefits, which is a violation of the Immigration and Nationality Act or INA. The blue sheet technically cites a provision of the law in the INA under section 221(g) wherein the officer believe there’s insufficient evidence to approve the case and will require further investigation into the statements or evidence submitted.

Simply the consular officer believes that the relationship between the U.S. citizen petitioner and the beneficiary was not sufficiently established to overcome the legal presumption that the marriage was entered into to evade immigration law. The consular officer either found a discrepancy at the personal visa interview with the fiancée or a discrepancy in the documentary evidence submitted. Alternatively, the consular officer discovered new and damaging evidence after investigating the fiancée’s background, or at the very least raised some red flags that require additional review. In cases such as this, should consult with an experienced U.S. immigration lawyer who specializes in consular processing to review the case thoroughly and provide you with some legal advice.